Monday, February 8, 2010

5 reasons why Apple didn't name the iPad the iTalbet or iSlate

I think I may know why Apple didn't name the iPad the iTablet or the iSlate.  Let me share 5 reasons (these are just my opinion):
  1. To dedicated tablet PC users, the term "tablet" implies that you should have the ability to use a stylus pen to write on the screen. This is also commonly called "inking" and we often rely on a Wacom-based active digitizer to write, draw, scribble, and erase. Unlike typical tablet computers, the iPad does not have an active digitizer and there is no stylus pen. 
  2. The term "slate" is often used to refer to a tablet PC that lacks a physical keyboard. Hence, the term "slate" could be misleading since people will automatically associate it with a Tablet PC, and this leads to point #1 above (even though HP will be releasing a slate that lacks an active digitizer).
  3. The word "tablet" has too many syllables. Notice how Apple likes to use simple words? We have the iPod. Not the iMP3player. Not the iMultimediaplayer. It's simply the iPod. Hence, the term iPad is short and simple. It fits the Apple culture.
  4. The term "slate" is already being used by HP to describe a small, handheld tablet multimedia computer. Apple wouldn't want to confuse its new iPad with a new produce released by HP, would it? My guess is that they were planning on naming it the iSlate until they discovered that HP was coming out with the "Slate." 
  5. The term "iPad" will subliminally also cross-promote the iPod because the two words are so similar.  In fact, when people talk about the iPad, everyone naturally thinks about the iPod. If Apple had used either iTablet or iSlate, people would not think about the iPod when they hear those terms. When consumers hear "iPad," they immediately think about the iPod. This type of cross-promotion is ingenious!
So, there you have it. What do you think? Agree or disagree?  I still think iNewton would have brought back many loyal users.

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